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Eagles unfortunate issues at WR put Carson Wentz behind the 8-ball

ARLINGTON, TX - OCTOBER 30: Philadelphia Eagles Wide Receiver Jordan Matthews (81) can't come up with the catch during a NFL game between the Dallas Cowboys and the Philadelphia Eagles on October 30, 2016, at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, TX. (Photo by Ray Carlin/Icon Sportswire)
Ray Carlin/Icon Sportswire

The Philadelphia Eagles are now 5-6 and have found themselves in need of serious help in order to get to the playoffs this season. After a strong 3-0 start, the Eagles have come back down to earth, losing six of their next eight games and failing to find any form of consistency on the offensive side of the ball. Rookie quarterback Carson Wentz is, at times, looking like a rookie once again. But the blame can’t really be placed on Wentz for his inconsistent play, as the Eagles’ rookie QB isn’t working with much in terms of his group of wide receivers.

Rookie quarterback Carson Wentz is, at times, looking like a rookie once again. But the blame can’t really be placed on Wentz for his inconsistent play, as the Eagles’ rookie QB isn’t working with much in terms of his group of wide receivers.

On Monday night against the Green Bay Packers, it was Tennessee Titans castoff Dorial Green-Beckham who led the team in receiving with six catches for 82 yards. It was a nice showing from Green-Beckham, but before this game, there wasn’t much that pointed toward him being ready to take over as anything near a No. 1 receiver. That’s not his role currently, though, as that goes to Jordan Matthews, a player who hasn’t topped the 100-yard mark since Week 1 against the winless Cleveland Browns. He has just three touchdowns on the year.

It’s not as though Matthews isn’t getting targets either. he’s seen double-digit looks in the four games before Monday (when he got injured) but posted mediocre numbers with an average of 71.25 yards per game in that stretch.

The issue isn’t so much of who’s on the roster currently for the Eagles, but it’s more about what their roles should be. Matthews doesn’t look like a No. 1 wide receiver, and in Monday’s loss to the Green Bay Packers, Nelson Agholor, whom the team spent a first-round pick on back in 2015, was inactive. Agholor has struggled with drops and being incredibly inconsistent this season, which is obviously concerning of a former No. 1 draft pick.

Even with the issues at wide receiver, the Eagles haven’t done nearly enough to fix them, and in turn, it’s going to place Wentz behind the 8-ball — not only throughout the remainder of 2016, but seemingly for the next few seasons. The Eagles needed receiving help this offseason, yet didn’t choose a single wideout in the NFL draft. In 2015 they put all their eggs in the Agholor basket. 2014 was when Philadelphia drafted Jordan Matthews and the recently-cut Josh Huff.

Aside from that, the most notable WR drafted in the four seasons prior  was Riley Cooper. Essentially, since 2009, they’ve made one very good selection in the NFL draft at receiver, and that was with Jeremy Maclin, whom they chose to let walk two offseasons ago.

There are obviously other ways to build a group of receivers to help a rookie, but the fact is, the Eagles didn’t have this unit set before they chose to sell the house to land Wentz. In turn, that’s going to result in what we’re seeing currently, which is a decline statistically from the North Dakota State product.

Again, it’s nothing against Wentz, who looks like he has all the tools to be a strong NFL quarterback. Unfortunately, after his hot start, he’s now tallied just 11 touchdowns against eight interceptions, numbers that look a bit more rookie-esque than they did over the first three games when he tossed five touchdowns against no interceptions.

Expect the Eagles to do something this offseason at wide receiver, but unless it’s a drastic move, it may not matter.

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